April 22 - 27, 2017 | Exhibits April 24 - 27 Las Vegas Convention Center

Video

Video

Video

VIdeo and The M.E.T. Effect℠

It’s everywhere, in every form.

Technology is expanding opportunities to integrate video content, which now comes in many different forms, formats and lengths. Professionals can even choose cameras able to capture 360 degree, virtual reality and aerial footage, broadening their traditional creative tools to engage viewers with a unique vision.   

The lengths of promotional videos are no longer dictated by 30, 60, or 90-second clips which were once the network advertising standard. Video of all lengths is available for integration to online, streaming and social media platforms, allowing artists to tell the story in the amount of time needed.

The capture and share aspect of video has always been important in education and information industries like eLearning and surveillance, but with the “connectivity of everything” we’re seeing more applications for video content within homes and in public spaces.

Join the Studios, Creatives, Videographers, Schools, Integrators, communications professionals and even Security Forces teams capturing, storing, editing and publishing public service announcements, “how to videos” and short content videos.

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Attractions and Pavilions

Spotlight Sessions

Virtual Reality and 360 degree video have truly come into their own this year with a huge presence at major live events including Super Bowl 50. VR and 360 degree represents the next content revolution for broadcasters. LiveU, a leader in live video acquisition, management, and distribution has a pulse on the emerging technology, its impact on the broadcast industry, and integration into broadcast workflows. Daniel Pisarski, a seasoned live video expert, will examine the organizations embracing VR, 360 degree and live video; organizations shooting/filming in this new format and why?; how the technology is being use; who isn't onboard?; why the technology hasn't been readily adopted yet?; And how this technology affects and integrates with broadcast technology. Dan will share case studies featuring companies pushing the envelope to blend traditional broadcast, online media and VR to engage with audiences. He'll also share best practices for adding new technology to your broadcast strategy and what you need to consider to ensure high resolution, great quality, and reliability. VR, 360 and live video offer a new paradigm for storytelling. Readers will learn how they can be part of this revolution.

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MPEG is working on requirements for a new video codec, expected to be completed by 2020. The future-generation codec is expected to provide a 50 percent bitrate reduction compared with HEVC Main profile for the same perceptual quality. While this is sufficient for certain use cases, it may justify a future video coding standard for other use cases that require bit-rate reductions higher than 50 percent. This paper will look at the target applications for the new video codec, the state of IP networks, and how network elements can potentially contribute to compression. This paper will present how new techniques can be used to reach a factor four compression vs. HEVC by 2020 using the next-generation MPEG codec. This is possible by leveraging (1) content-aware encoding, (2) elastic encoding, (3) machine learning techniques, and (4) pre/post processing pairing that uses metadata to signal how to post process video after decoding.

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Audio and video over IP have been in use for quite some time now in media contribution and distribution. While discrete digital signal transport (i.e. SDI and AES/MADI) remained the most commonly used methods for media signal transport within production and broadcast facilities, recent technology developments have enabled IT- and IP-based transport methods to gain even greater traction in this last bastion of tradition. Initial technology bridgeheads pushed by individual company efforts, usually based on a blend of technology standards and proprietary seasoning, are now followed by an industry-wide consolidation. Industry alliances like AIMS, AMWA, MNA and VSF are bringing together individual technology achievements to form condensed, best-of-breed concepts based on existing broadcast workflows and proven IT standards. And standards organizations like AES and SMPTE are working hard on defining future-proof interoperability standards based on these concepts. If underlying technology acronyms like IP, UDP, RTP, PTP, SDP, SIP, SAP, SDN sound somehow familiar to you, and you have heard about industry alliances like AIMS, AMWA, MNA, VSF, JT-NM and the concepts they are promoting, such as TR03/04, AES67, NMOS, but are not really sure how all this relates to each other and to the work AES, SMPTE, IEEE and IETF are currently conducting, this session may be for you.

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